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Melbourne laneway cuts waste by 90pc

Melbourne laneway cuts waste by 90pc | Waste Services | Scoop.it

Two-and-a-half tonnes of food scraps from 90 businesses in the Degraves Street area are dehydrated and turned into fertiliser each week, which is then spread on parks and gardens throughout the city.

 

"The reason we're doing this is obviously to clean our laneways up, but the bigger picture is 250,000 tonnes of organic waste every year goes into landfill - that's enough to fill Eureka Tower to the top," said councillor Arron Wood from the City of Melbourne.

 

The recycling program costs the City of Melbourne $300,000 annually and provides employment for seven workers.

 

"What we've seen immediately is a clean-up of the laneways, so that's an amenity issue," said councillor Wood.

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Landfill legacy leads to recycling revolution

Landfill legacy leads to recycling revolution | Waste Services | Scoop.it

More than five years later, his site is one of the only privately owned dumps in far-north Queensland that recycles much of its waste.

 

Copper, aluminium, stainless steel, green waste and anything else of value is sorted and recycled on site, or sent away to third-party recycling agents.

 

Even slabs of concrete — some that have been buried for years — are broken down to various degrees and resold as road base, aggregate or sand.

 

Most significantly, Mr Hannagan recycles as much steel as possible to limit the amount of material going underground.

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Call to dump landfills

Call to dump landfills | Waste Services | Scoop.it

MELBOURNES peak municipal waste authority has put forward a draft plan for rubbish to steer the city away from long-term dependence on landfill.

 

According to the Metropoli­tan Waste and Resource Recovery Group (MWRRG),  2.8 million of the 10 million tonnes of garbage we create each year goes to landfill.

 

While resource recovery rates have jumped from 57 per cent to 73 per cent in the past decade, there are plenty more ways to reduce waste.

 

MWRRG expects that by 2042 the city will be generating 16.5 million tonnes of rubbish a year — that’s a 63 per cent spike.

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Recycling in the ACT: the next step is totally organic

Recycling in the ACT: the next step is totally organic | Waste Services | Scoop.it

The recent announcement by the ACT government that it is about to pilot collecting household garden waste is most welcome. Indeed, it is the first crucial step in creating community awareness about the importance of healthy soil to our economy. Although many city dwellers tend to take soil for granted, good soil is by far society's most valuable asset, as it underpins the economy, the quality of our domestic food supply and the competitiveness of our agricultural exports.

 

Over recent years, Australia's rapidly expanding population has led to an exponential increase in the volume of urban waste. In total, we now produce about 60 million tonnes annually, and spend $11 billion managing it. Once solid recyclables such as glass, plastic, metal and paper have been removed from our domestic waste, the largest single part remaining in our household bins – about 70 per cent – is food and other organic waste, which ideally should be source-separated, composted and returned to the soil.

 

In this way, we can simultaneously address a serious environmental problem and raise community awareness of the importance of soil productivity. Our agricultural lands and farmers have been under increasing pressure from urban sprawl, population growth, mining operations and soil degradation.

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More industrial action for Canberra's garbage truck drivers

More industrial action for Canberra's garbage truck drivers | Waste Services | Scoop.it

Temporary garbage disposal drop-off sites will be in place next week as Canberra's garbage truck drivers walk off the job again.

 

About two-fifths of Canberra suburbs will be affected by the strikes next Monday and Tuesday, as a stoush between drivers and contractor Suez over severance pay continues.

 

ACT NOWaste director Michael Trushell said due to the wide area the industrial action covered, catch up collection services would not be possible.

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7 things you should be putting in recycling

7 things you should be putting in recycling | Waste Services | Scoop.it

Even though contaminated recycling is bad, sometimes we do just the opposite - items end up in the landfill because we don’t realise they’re actually recyclable.

 

According to a 2015 report by the non-profit organisation Planet Ark, 115 councils across Australia have identified plastic bags as the number one recycling mistake, with 92% complaining about soft plastics contamination in their recycling streams.

 

However, the next biggest mistake is putting recyclable stuff into the general waste bin. This way it misses out on the opportunity to become something new.

 

Almost half of all Aussie councils (48%) have identified this as an issue, so here’s a refresher on some of the things you may not realise can be recycled - even if it might require a little more effort.

Top4s insight:

7 things you should be putting in recycling are:

 

Pizza boxes
Bottle tops
Soy sauce fishes
Take-away containers
Aluminium foil
Long-life milk and juice cartons
Aerosol cans

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Why Are We So Bad At Recycling Rare Metals From Technology?

Why Are We So Bad At Recycling Rare Metals From Technology? | Waste Services | Scoop.it

We’re terrible at recycling rare and important metals from our devices.

 

Gold recycling is the recipe for a viral story, but there’s a group of metals that are even harder to come by, and far more vital to modern technology. Called rare earths, these obscure elements are sprinkled in virtually every consumer electronic, automobile, and green energy product on the market. They’re the spark that supercharges our technology, bringing us higher speeds, better performance, longer lifespans, and greater efficiency.

 

And yet after we use rare earths once, we discard them. Why?

 

“This is basically a problem of economics,” Alex King, director of the Critical Materials Institute, told Gizmodo. “When you’re trying to recover anything from post-consumer waste, the first thing you have to do is collect a large amount of it. Sometimes, the cost of that step exceeds the value of the metal you want to recycle.”

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Recycling monster truck tyres: big challenge, huge rewards

Recycling monster truck tyres: big challenge, huge rewards | Waste Services | Scoop.it

There’s no denying the national scourge of tyre dumping and disposal is a massive environmental problem, but magnify rubber radials to the size of those used on gigantic mining trucks, earth-movers and big tractors and you’ve literally got a monster-size problem.

 

As Australia’s mining boom cools, resources companies and local councils are being forced to grapple with how to safely and sustainably deal with the estimated 155,000 tonnes of giant rubber – known as Off the Road Tyres or OTRs – discarded each year which are just too big and expensive to move.

 

Big tyres claim a big chunk of tyre waste stream too, making the problem of OTR disposal as colossal as the giant rubber wheels themselves.

 

Government commissioned research estimates OTRs make-up close to a third of the toxic spent tyre load, proving size really does matter.

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Big changes for Bogan Waste Management

Big changes for Bogan Waste Management | Waste Services | Scoop.it

Users of the Bogan Shire tip will soon be charged and the facility will be manned due to new rules the council has comply with.

 

Council resolved in May 2015 to comply with the requirements from the Environment Protection Licence and there would be limited access of 45 hours per week to the site.

 

In addition to this, at the February meeting, council heard that a senior council worker observe red the tip site over a weekend in January and noted people from other shires were using the free facility.

 

Mayor Ray Donald updated the senior citizens of the waste depot's progress at their morning tea on Thursday.

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Big Banana leading the way in the recycling stakes

Big Banana leading the way in the recycling stakes | Waste Services | Scoop.it

MORE than 75% of businesses agree reducing waste and recycling is part of being a sustainable and ethical business, yet 58% keep virtually no records on their waste management.

 

A new report by Planet Ark, What's the Deal with Business Waste? shows failing to understand the amount of waste generated, and monitoring it, is a significant obstacle to implementing waste management practices that can have both environmental and financial benefits.

 

Three years ago, The Big Banana Fun Park had no recycling facilities, all food was served in takeaway containers and cardboard was incinerated on site.

 

Now, the Coffs Harbour attraction is diverting 22.4 tonnes of waste from landfill every year - roughly the same weight as 36 mid-size cars.

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World first to improve waste management at Iluka

World first to improve waste management at Iluka | Waste Services | Scoop.it

Clarence Valley Council adopts new Australian-designed method of dealing with waste at the Iluka Waste Transfer Station.

 

The Contained Waste Transfer System is an Australian invention, and is a simple and cost effective solution that Contained Waste Solutions innovations manager Grant Lacey hopes will revolutionise the waste transfer industry.

 

"The waste transfer industry is hungry for solutions that improve recycling and safety," he said.

 

The system is centred on specially designed open fronted loader bins, which are arranged into bays at ground level. Customers can load their waste into the corresponding bucket depending on the waste being dumped.

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Help recycle your Easter egg foil into cans, baseball bats

Help recycle your Easter egg foil into cans, baseball bats | Waste Services | Scoop.it

Did you know the foil wrapping from the Easter eggs you eat this weekend can be recycled?

 

Chocolate Easter eggs are typically wrapped in coloured foil and come in cardboard or plastic holders — all of which can be recycled across Australia.

 

Catherine Higgins from ACT No Waste said recycled foil was typically re-manufactured within six weeks.

 

"Aluminium foil is one of the most recyclable of the products, as in it saves the most energy if we do recycle it," she said.

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Revealed: Top 30 Australian councils for recycling mobile phones

Revealed: Top 30 Australian councils for recycling mobile phones | Waste Services | Scoop.it

Thirty Australian local councils will compete to be named the country’s top mobile phone recycler in the MobileMuster Local Government Awards.

 

The awards will go to councils who have collected the most mobile phone components for recycling per head of their population between 1 May 2015 and 30 April 2016 in each state and nationally. The top council mobile collectors so far are: Bruce Rock Shire Council, WA; Burwood Council, NSW; District Council of Coober Pedy, SA; District Council of Orroroo-Carrieton, SA and the Shire of Kondinin, WA.

 

Spyro Kalos, Recycling Manager at MobileMuster said councils can help divert thousands of tonnes of non-renewable resources out of landfill and back into the supply chain.

 

“Councils play a major role in educating and providing convenient drop-off locations for residents to recycle their old mobile phones and accessories,” Mr Kalos said.

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World first to improve waste management at Iluka

World first to improve waste management at Iluka | Waste Services | Scoop.it

ILUKA is the site for a world first, with Clarence Valley Council adopting a new method of dealing with waste at the Iluka Waste Transfer Station.

 

The Contained Waste Transfer System is an Australian invention, and is a simple and cost effective solution that Contained Waste Solutions innovations manager Grant Lacey hopes will revolutionise the waste transfer industry.

 

"The waste transfer industry is hungry for solutions that improve recycling and safety," he said.

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Recycling and Reusing is Good for the Environment and the Company Brand 

Recycling and Reusing is Good for the Environment and the Company Brand  | Waste Services | Scoop.it

When it comes to burnishing your company’s brand and cleaning is footprint, the efforts center on reducing, reusing and recycling nearly every material in the shop. That’s a key point that ISS’ head of global sustainability Dan Gilbert made at Environmental Leader’s conference in a session held Tuesday on corporate sustainability.

 

The ultimate aim, he said, is to create “zero waste,” which can mean eliminating anywhere between 90 percent and 100 percent of what it is that your company is putting into landfills. The last 10 percent, he emphasized, is where the real work is. To get there, businesses should be measuring and managing their waste streams, and reporting their progress at least on a quarterly basis.

 

“What is the cost of recycling versus putting it in the trash,” Gilbert told the audience, at the conference held in Denver, which continues through Thursday. “If you save money, your corporate leadership is more likely to get behind the initiative.”

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Melbourne laneway cuts waste by 90pc

Melbourne laneway cuts waste by 90pc | Waste Services | Scoop.it

Two-and-a-half tonnes of food scraps from 90 businesses in the Degraves Street area are dehydrated and turned into fertiliser each week, which is then spread on parks and gardens throughout the city.

 

"The reason we're doing this is obviously to clean our laneways up, but the bigger picture is 250,000 tonnes of organic waste every year goes into landfill - that's enough to fill Eureka Tower to the top," said councillor Arron Wood from the City of Melbourne.

 

The recycling program costs the City of Melbourne $300,000 annually and provides employment for seven workers.

 

"What we've seen immediately is a clean-up of the laneways, so that's an amenity issue," said councillor Wood.

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Tyre recycling facilities could turn oversupply into competitive industry

Tyre recycling facilities could turn oversupply into competitive industry | Waste Services | Scoop.it

A long-term solution to Tasmania's tyre waste problem is on the horizon, with a new facility preparing to shred thousands of tyres every year.

 

The new tyre shredding facility proposed for the state's south has been given approval by the Environment Protection Authority (EPA).

 

The site at Brighton would use a shredder to process around 300,000 tyres a year.

 

Proponent Tyron Barwick said the shredded tyres would be shipped to a processor in Melbourne.

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Government cheers West Arthur recycling project

Government cheers West Arthur recycling project | Waste Services | Scoop.it

WEST ARTHUR will be one of 17 Western Australian communities to receive funding for decreasing waste and improving recycling methods. 

 

The first round of The State Government’s Community Grants Scheme funding for 2016 will provide $128,000 for groups from regional centres including Exmouth, Denmark and the Wheatbelt. 

 

Recipients will also include Perth-based groups from Bedfordale, Belmont and Rockingham. 

 

WA Environment Minister Albert Jacob said the groups provided important initiatives and public education for minimising waste. 

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Push to boost drinking water supply with recycled sewage

Push to boost drinking water supply with recycled sewage | Waste Services | Scoop.it

A landmark sewage recycling plant in Perth’s northern suburbs could be expanded next year to boost the city’s fragile drinking supplies.

 

As the State Government prepares to hand down its 2016-17 fiscal blueprint today, it is believed room will be made to double the Water Corporation’s groundwater replenishment scheme.

 

But it is expected to be almost twice as expensive as first thought and cost almost $200 million.

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New Aus waste paint recycling plan set

New Aus waste paint recycling plan set | Waste Services | Scoop.it

A new campaign aims to use five million litres of paint that end up in Australian landfills to replace fossil fuel.

 

The Paintback program, funded by major paint companies and backed by state and federal governments, aims to collect more than 45,000 tonnes of waste paint and packaging from professional and home painters over the next five years.

 

It will then be turned into an alternative fuel source or recycled.

 

Professional painters are excluded from government-run schemes and need to pay $4 a litre to dispose of unwanted paint.

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Recycling when commodity prices are low

Recycling when commodity prices are low | Waste Services | Scoop.it

The Australian Council of Recycling (ACOR) claims the government has failed to act to prevent the devastating effect that China's steel industry, combined with lower commodity prices, is having on Australian steel, and recycling.

 

Recycling businesses already export some waste overseas due to the high cost of breaking down and extracting resources from the salvaged items, but ACOR CEO Grant Musgrove says the only way to have this waste processed in Australia is to reduce landfill levies and call out China for its overproduction of steel.

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Cans, bottles, now shells? Mussel recycling gives Port Phillip a boost

Cans, bottles, now shells? Mussel recycling gives Port Phillip a boost | Waste Services | Scoop.it

These days bottles, cans, newspapers, printer cartridges, even mobile phones, can be recycled. Now it seems shells can be added to the list.

 

For about a year kitchen staff at the Little Creatures brewery in Geelong have been keeping discarded shells from the plates of mussels they sell to hungry customers.


The shells are destined to find their way to the bottom of Port Phillip Bay as part of a landmark environmental project to recreate lost shellfish reefs and boost habitat for the bay's marine wildlife.

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Tyre Stewardship Australia part of waste management expo

Tyre Stewardship Australia part of waste management expo | Waste Services | Scoop.it

Tyre Stewardship Australia (TSA), a tyre industry initiative focusing on the nation’s growing tyre recycling challenge, has announced it will be participating in this year’s Waste Management in Action (WMIA) expo, which will be part of the upcoming Melbourne Truck Show in May.


“Australians generate over 51 million end-of-life tyres each year and currently only a small proportion is recycled. Whilst the task of addressing Australia’s end-of-life tyre management may seem daunting, the combined efforts of the tyre industry are focussed on turning waste into future opportunities,” TSA said in a media statement.


“WMIA presents another avenue for spreading the message that this environmental challenge can be addressed through industry recognition and cooperation.”

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Businesses can make money by recycling

Businesses can make money by recycling | Waste Services | Scoop.it

Cafes in inner Sydney are paying to dump 3,000 tonnes of coffee grounds in landfill each year, when a little more attention to recycling could save them money.

 

A report from not-for-profit environmental group Planet Ark says 70 per cent of businesses think they are doing all they can to reduce waste, even though only 60 per cent of commercial and industrial waste is recycled.

 

If businesses use a recycling contractor to pick up their waste instead of sending it to landfill, they will save money and in some cases even make money, Planet Ark campaign head Brad Gray said.

 

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Lithium: Australia needs to recycle and lease to be part of the boom

Lithium: Australia needs to recycle and lease to be part of the boom | Waste Services | Scoop.it

Australia is pivoting its economy away from resources like coal and iron ore, but are there other commodities we can bank on to take up some of the slack? In this “future commodities” series we explore the economic future for commodities we’ve always relied on, and some we haven’t.

 

 

Australia has an opportunity to capitalise on the increasing global demand for lithium batteries by developing recycling systems and creating models for leasing the resource.

 

Lithium is the third element in the periodic table and the lightest classified as a metal. This makes it a good choice in battery applications needing lightweight energy storage. Lithium-ion batteries are now increasingly common in smartphones, electric vehicles and indeed Tesla powerwalls, the first of which was recently installed in Australia.

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Sydney Water's $99 million Hoxton Park water recycling scheme never activated

Sydney Water's $99 million Hoxton Park water recycling scheme never activated | Waste Services | Scoop.it

Sydney was promised discounted water and while 3000 people signed up, not enough have done so to turn the taps on.

 

Five years past deadline and nearly three years since it was built, not a single tap has been turned on for a $99 million state government water recycling scheme.

 

When construction began nearly a decade ago, the previous state Labor government boasted that its Hoxton Park Recycled Water scheme would be operational by 2011.

 

It was styled as one of the most significant pieces of environmental infrastructure in Australia that would pump water into homes across Sydney's booming south-west for use in gardens and laundries.

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